Tag Archives: Macrobiotic

Macrobiotic Diet: Can The Diet Help Spiritually and With Your Health?

18 Sep

The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine, the oldest-known book of Chinese medicine, is the foundation of the macrobiotic diet. Ronald E. Kotzsch writes in Macrobiotics: Yesterday and Today that The Yellow Emperor’s Classic “asserts that food is an important means for treating disease. It says that in ‘medieval days’ the sages treated illness first by diet, usually prescribing a regime of rice gruel for ten days. If this treatment was not successful, then the roots and leaves of medicinal plants were used to harmonize the energies. Acupuncture and moxibustion were employed only as a last resort. If the emotions and the will of the patient are stable, says the Classic, then cereals alone can effect a cure. Grains have a special importance and power as human food. Water and grains are the root of life and ‘death comes only when they are exhausted.’ In particular, rice is mentioned as a vital and harmonious food.”

The Yellow Emperor’s Classic is attributed to Huang Ti, the legendary Yellow Emperor (born c. 2704 B.C.), but was probably not written down until about 500 B.C. The Yellow Emperor is believed to have ruled China during a golden age and is considered the ancestor of all Chinese people. The diet was given by Sanat Kumara to the lightbearers and, among others, to Lord Lanto, who is said to have inspired The Yellow Emperor’s Classic.

The messenger has given numerous lectures on the macrobiotic diet, including how human behavior and physical and mental health relate to the condition of the body’s organs and what foods are beneficial to the health of the organs.

Diet and the spiritual path

Sanat Kumara has spoken of the importance of diet on the spiritual path:

Come, then, into conformity with your true inner being. Espouse, if you will, as the messenger has, the present awareness of the diet of the Eastern adepts. Espouse, then, that path whereby you recognize that all things have consciousness.

From the mosquito who lands on your arm to the ant or the worm—all things have consciousness. The leafy green vegetables you eat also have consciousness, as does every other food. Thus, consider yourself to be made up of the various consciousnesses of the substances of which you have partaken. Shun, therefore, those meats of red blood but rather prefer the fish of the sea that are in abundance and readily available, that can balance your four lower bodies when you include the proper complements of grains, vegetables and seaweeds. And thereby you might one day know the freedom, if it be your choice, unless you have concluded that a specific condition in your body requires them for a time of not having to necessarily continue to eat fish, for you will know the strength of God within you….

Fortification of the physical body, then, provides the chalice for the soul and the Atman. And I, Sanat Kumara, promise you this: I will inhabit the physical body of anyone who does prepare that body and who does maintain the mind that is more yang than yin. I will inhabit that body, portion by portion of myself, even as you increase your God consciousness portion by portion.”[1]

Many spiritual traditions recommend avoiding meat when one is pursuing the spiritual path, as Sanat Kumara speaks of in this dictation. This is easier for those who are away from the pressures of the world in a monastery or a spiritual retreat. Every person is different and individual needs vary according to body chemistry. Although the ascended masters recommend a less dense diet with little or no red meat, they do expect students to be practical and make their own choices in consultation with their Higher Self. They encourage a healthy diet of grains, fresh vegetables and lighter protein sources, citing fish and poultry as being preferable to meat.

Students pursuing a spiritual path often tend naturally to eat less meat, since they find that a lighter diet helps in maintaining spiritual attunement. However, students of the masters who have a lifestyle that involves heavy physical work, especially in cold climates, may find that lighter foods do not meet all their needs, and that they need to partake of heavier foods, including red meats, to maintain balance in the body. They also find that they can transmute these dense foods quickly through their physical labor and the violet flame. This may be also the case for students on the spiritual path who are going through an intense period of work or stress and may feel the need for some meat or other heavier foods to help them stay more tethered to the physical plane.

Overall, it is better to complete one’s divine plan while eating meat as opposed to not being able to function effectively in the physical plane and hence not complete one’s divine plan because of not eating meat. The master El Morya has said that if one eats red meat, then it would be best to increase the amount of violet flame to help transmute any toxins or density associated with the meat.

While the principles of yin and yang underlying the macrobiotic diet are universal, the diet as it is taught by some practitioners today does not suit all constitutions. The masters are very practical and ask us to make our attunement with our own body Holy Christ Self and to trust that attunement. Be sure to consult a doctor or health-care practitioner if you have a medical or mental condition or if you are pregnant or nursing.

Research has linked modern diet and lifestyle habits to virtually all the debilitating chronic degenerative diseases, as well as lesser health issues generally attributed to aging. Without knowing which dietary and lifestyle changes can bring the health transformation people are looking for, is it any wonder there is a health crisis in the world today?

Macrobiotic DietMacrobiotics is a system that can be used to create extraordinary health, through using both traditional wisdom and modern knowledge to ascertain the underlying causes of an individuals current health challenges, and make adjustments to their food and lifestyle choices that support health improvement. Not simply a diet, macrobiotic recognizes the profound effects food, environment, activities, and attitude all have on our body-mind-emotions.

Whether you want to simply learn how to use our powerful food and lifestyle recommendations to optimize your health or support overcoming health issues, or you want to deepen your understanding of the principles upon which macrobiotics is based, and learn advanced cooking techniques and the skills of macrobiotic visual diagnosis.

Food categories and general daily proportions for persons living in a temperate climate:

Whole Cereal Grains

40 60% by weight

Organically grown, whole grain is recommended, which can be cooked in a variety of ways.

Grains include: Brown rice, barley, millet, oats, corn, rye, wheat, and buckwheat. While whole grains are recommended, a small portion of the recommended percentage of grains may consist of noodles or pasta, un-yeasted whole grain breads, and other partially processed whole cereal grains.

Vegetables

Approximately 20 30% by weight

Local and organically grown vegetables are recommended, with the majority being cooked in various styles such as lightly steamed or boiled, sautéed with a small amount of unrefined, cold pressed oil, etc. A small portion may be used as fresh salad, and a very small volume as pickles.

Vegetables for daily use include: green cabbage, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, collards, pumpkin, watercress, parsley, Chinese cabbage, bok choy, dandelion, mustard greens, daikon greens, scallion, onions, daikon radish, turnips, burdock, carrots, and winter squash such as butternut, buttercup, and acorn squash.

For occasional use in season (2 to 3 times a week): cucumber, celery, lettuce, herbs such as dill and chives. Vegetables not recommended for regular use include: potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, spinach, beets, and zucchini.

Beans & Sea Vegetables

Approximately 5 10 % by weight

The most suitable beans for regular use are azuki beans, chickpeas, and lentils. Other beans may be used on occasion. Bean products such as tofu, tempeh, and natto can also be used. Sea vegetables such as nori, wakame, kombu, hiziki, arame, dulse, and agar-agar are an important part of the macrobiotic diet as they provide many vitamins and minerals.

Macrobiotic Dietary Pyramid

Soups

Soups may be made with vegetables, sea vegetables, grains, or beans. Seasonings include miso, tamari or shoyu (soy sauce), and sea salt.

Beverages

Recommended beverages include: roasted kukicha twig tea, stem tea, roasted brown rice tea, roasted barley tea, dandelion root tea, and cereal grain coffee. Any traditional tea that does not have an aromatic fragrance or a stimulating effect can also be used.

When drinking water, spring or good quality well water is recommended, without ice.

Occasional Foods

Recommended fish include fresh white-meat fish such as flounder, sole, cod, carp, halibut or trout.

Fruit or fruit desserts, made from fresh or dried fruit, may be served two or three times a week. Local and organically grown fruits are preferred. If you live in a temperate climate, avoid tropical and semitropical fruit and rather eat temperate climate fruits such as apples, pears, plums, peaches, apricots, berries and melons. Frequent use of fruit juice is not advisable.

Lightly roasted nuts and seeds such as pumpkin, sesame, and sunflower seeds may be enjoyed. Peanuts, walnuts and pecans may be enjoyed as an occasional snack.

Rice syrup, barley malt, amasake, and mirin may be used as sweeteners.

Brown rice vinegar or umeboshi vinegar may be used occasionally for a sour taste.

 

Macrobiotic Lifestyle Suggestions

  • Eat only when hungry.
  • Proper chewing (around 50 times or more per mouthful) is important for good digestion and assimilation of nutrients.
  • Eat in an orderly and relaxed manner. When you eat, sit with a good posture and take a moment to express gratitude for the food.
  • You may eat regularly two or three times per day, as much as you want, provided the proportion is generally correct and each mouthful is thoroughly chewed. It is best to leave the table satisfied but not full.
  • Drink liquids moderately, only when thirsty.
  • For the deepest and most restful sleep, retire before midnight and avoid eating at least 2 to 3 hours before sleeping.
  • Wash as needed, but avoid long hot baths or showers which deplete the body of minerals.
  • Use cosmetics and cleaning products that are made from natural, non-toxic ingredients. Avoid chemically-perfumed products. For care of the teeth, brush with natural toothpaste.
  • As much as possible, wear cotton clothing, especially for undergarments. Avoid wearing synthetic or woolen clothing directly on the skin. Avoid wearing excessive accessories.
  • Spend time outdoors if strength permits. Walk on the grass, beach, or soil for at least one half hour every day. Spend some time in direct sunlight daily.
  • Exercise regularly. Activities may include walking, yoga, martial arts, dance, etc.
  • Include some large green plants in the home to freshen and enrich the oxygen content of the air. Open windows daily to permit fresh air to circulate, even in cold weather.
  • Keep your home in good order, especially the areas where food is prepared and served.
  • To increase circulation and elimination of toxins, scrub the entire body with a hot, damp towel every morning or every night. If that is not possible, at least scrub the hands, feet, fingers and toes.
  • Avoid using electric cooking devices (ovens and ranges) or microwave ovens. The use of a gas or wood stove is preferred.
  • Use earthenware, cast iron, or stainless steel cookware rather than aluminum or Teflon-coated pots.
  • Minimize the frequent use of television and computers. When using a computer, protect yourself from potentially harmful electromagnetic fields with a protective shield over the screen or other safety devices.
  • Sing a happy song!

 

Sources

Pearls of Wisdom, vol. 32, no. 30, July 23, 1989.

Pearls of Wisdom, vol. 32, no. 19, May 7, 1989.

Pearls of Wisdom, vol. 31, no. 34, July 2, 1988

Pearls of Wisdom, vol. 36, no. 48, October 13, 1993.

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